Social Media Etiquette

January 27, 2009

Do you use your real name or a pen name?  When is it OK to ask to connect?  When is it OK to ask for a recommendation?  Do you experience more Social Media Etiquette sanfu’s on LinkedIn, Facebook or Twitter?  Is swearing OK?  All things to discuss Wednesday night at 8 Eastern, 6 Mountain and 5 Pacific.

To join us:

1- Go to Tweetchat.com

2- Enter the “room” #lion

3 – Start tweeting

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How open are you on social media?

January 18, 2009

What’s the most outrageous thing you’ve ever said online?  Did it come back to bite you?  Join Peggy, Mari and I every Wed. night on http://www.tweetchat.com at 8 Eastern, 5 Pacific (which means 6 for all my Colorado followers).  You’ll need to sign in when it asks for a room, type in  #lion.  And then join in the fun.

LION stands for LinkedIn Open Networker in case you were wondering.  Sounded better than TWOG

Re:blogged from Peggy Dolane

Last week on Twitter, @linkedinexpert, @marismith and myself hosted #lion: a tweet-in that asked the question: How open a networker are you on LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter?. #lion came from LinkedIn Open Networker — a person who grows their network as broadly as possible.

This week we thought we’d continue the #lion conversation with the question:

Are there limits of what you share about yourself on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn?
To get the conversation started, here’s some food for thought:

  • Lisa Nova poked fun at the over-tweeters amoung us in her youtube satire Twitter Whore (viewed by over 730,000 to date.) None of us want to be that person, do we?
  • Smart businesses know that a real person tweeting will win you more loyal followers. Just ask Scott Monty at Ford, @Zappos’ CEO, or @TypeAMom, Kelby Carr who wrote a great post about this issue last summer.
  • On a more serious note, Canadian child protection authorities were contacted by Twitter recently when a mother made comments about how she might get her children to go to sleep.

There are lots of things I might Tweet about, but choose not to. Does your tweeting have any limits? Do you save more personal information for FaceBook and keep LinkedIn strictly business?

Hope you’ll join me the #lion discussion, Wednesday, January 22, 6:00 p.m. Mountain, 8:00 p.m. Eastern.


How Personal Should You Get in Social Media?

January 16, 2009

What’s the most outrageous thing you’ve ever said online?  Did it come back to bite you?  Join Peggy, Mari and I every Wed. night on http://www.tweetchat.com at 8 Eastern, 5 Pacific (which means 6 for all my Colorado followers).  You’ll need to sign in when it asks for a room, type in  #lion.  And then join in the fun.

LION stands for LinkedIn Open Networker in case you were wondering.  Sounded better than TWOG

How Open a Networker are You?

OK – I know I said I was a promiscuous networker. And I am. But let’s talk about how “personal” one should get in social networking.

It depends, of course, upon the platform. MySpace lends itself to embarrassing amounts of personal information and revealing pictures that might haunt you for the rest of your life. FaceBook can easily assume the same “personal” touch. LinkedIn is – and should remain – a strictly business platform. And Twitter is ever a hybrid of all of the above.

Despite the range in “touchiness”, here is my opinion: if it’s public – be professional. As Jeffrey Gitomer says in his “Little black Book of Connections” You have to more than classy – you have to be first class.

Let us not forget that everything we put on the web – from blogs, to tweets, to updates, to profiles – are archived and searchable. There is a paper I wrote for a Canadian University Intranet group on “Native Canadians Folklore” posted way back in 1992, and it is still out there. That’s not so embarrassing. But let’s take into account the secretary I didn’t hire because her MySpace personal statement was “I want to throw sharp things at your face.”

Don’t assume that just because your social media platform is private, strategic or protected that the information is not there to stay. Someone will find it some day – and you might live to regret that. So when it comes to social media – “keep your shirt on, your pants zipped and your information professional and relevant.”

Having said all that – I met my fiancé because of LinkedIn (I took one of his classes – and I was “sold”). So keep it professional online – and do whatever you want offline J


How do you use your social networks?

January 7, 2009

Whether you are a wide-open networker, like Viveka or Mari, or a strategic networker, like Peggy, you’ve probably had to spend a little time deciding who you will befriend and who you will ignore on your various social networks.

Note: This blog jointly written by Viveka von Rosen, Mari Smith and Peggy Dolane and is an example of the power of social marketing.


Viveka von Rosen, @linkedinexpert

Viveka Von Rosen is the CSMO (Chief Social Media Officer) of Integrated Alliances, and the Social Media and Marketing Director for The Executive Center. A victim of expensive and ineffective traditional marketing, Viveka was able to double TEC’s business through social and F2F networking. It is now her passion in life to help others build their businesses through social media strategies.

I am what you might call a promiscuous networker. In fact, I never say no to anyone (on LinkedIn that is.) Folks like me are known in LinkedIn as LIONS (LinkedIn Open Networkers). And to be completely transparent, LinkedIn doesn’t like us much.

Since I am in the field of social media strategy and marketing, I feel I need a giant network as a service to my clients. In numbers this means I have 4200+ direct connections and 17+ million in my LinkedIn Network (and growing). Both my Twitter and Facebook networks are significantly smaller only because I am a late-comer to both. It has been my experience, that the larger the network, the bigger the portal into the LinkedIn world, and the more likely I am to find the diamond amongst the gravel that my clients are looking for. It’s true that I might not be able to give the warmest introduction to someone I don’t know well, (unless I do) but I am at least able to give an introduction. A large network is most useful for Job Seekers and people in Sales and Recruiting where it is a numbers game.

“C” level folks will probably want to remain “LaMBs” (“Look at My Buds”) LaMBs (like Peggy) know everyone in their network, and if you are lucky enough to connect with one, you will find their network much more useful than a LION network. LIONs love LaMBs. I can contact Peggy and I know she knows everyone in her network and could, should she choose, give me a very warm written, perhaps even verbal recommendation.

Mari Smith @marismith:

Mari Smith is a Relationship Marketing Specialist and Social Media Business Coach. Dubbed the Pied Piper of the Facebook by Fast Company, Mari helps entrepreneurs to grow their business profits using an integrated social marketing strategy.

For Facebook®, I would call myself a strategic networker more than an open networker. My strategy from the get go (July 2007) was to reach out to all the big name influential people I could find in my industry: authors, speakers, trainers, internet marketers, even celebrity actors, etc. If certain people were not yet on Facebook, I would find a way to contact them and help them get set up (which is why Fast Company calls me “the Pied Piper of Facebook®!”)

Then, what I endeavor to do consistently is what I call “Radical Strategic Visibility.” Because of the News Feed feature of Facebook®, by deliberately and strategically choosing all my activities, I can show up in the feeds of these highly influential friends to the point they contact me.

I like to say “it’s not what you know, it’s who you know… and *who knows you.*” Facebook® provides an unprecedented opportunity to position yourself consistently as THE go-to person in your niche/industry.

Peggy Dolane, @freerangemom

Peggy Dolane, principal at Provient Marketing, designs affordable marketing programs and writes engaging copy that turns your audience into customers.

My strategic network isn’t huge – it’s somewhere around 300 people. That includes about 100 people I follow closely on Twitter, about 100 LinkedIn contacts (all of whom I have worked with or know personally), about 100 Outlook contacts, and perhaps 50 friends on Facebook. I’m not counting the hundreds of families I know through my kid’s school, church or community service projects I’ve been involved in – but I probably should!

What it doesn’t have in numbers, it makes up in relationships. I define my strategic network as my community – people I know well enough to ask for a favor. My goal is to build relationships, not numbers of contacts. I don’t accept every invitation I get on LinkedIn, for example, because every one of my LinkedIn contacts are people I’d feel confident in recommending their work and having it reflect back on me. But that doesn’t mean that I don’t actively mine LinkedIn via participating in groups and answering questions as opportunities to connect to new people. (Just email me for free copy of my LinkedIn Marketing Checklist.)

I am an open networker on StumbleUpon, Digg, and BizNik. I use these networks to reaching out to new and broader audiences. Frankly, I’m still growing into my open network strategy. I believe open networking has great value, but I’m still cautiously opening my network doors. I’m fairly open on Twitter – following back nearly anyone who looks like I have something in common with and who isn’t just amassing followers.

People to Follow

One of the great things about networking is meeting new people. With that in mind we thought we’d introduce our readers to people we think you might be interested in following:

Twitter:

LinkedIn:

Digg:

  • Mike Witt, http://digg.com/users/wittmc — Mike’s passion is helping people grow their at-home businesses. He’s got a network of 750+ friends on Digg that he uses judiciously, without spamming.

Facebook:

Next month
We plan to explore how we grow our networks. But in the meantime, what type of networker are you? Lion, Lamb or something else all together?

We hope you’ll leave a comment here about your networking style, then join us LIVE on Twitter on Wednesday, January, 14, 2009, 8 – 9 p.m. Eastern Time to explore more about the pros and cons of open vs. strategic networking. You’ll have a chance to meet a great group of people, and who knows, even learn something!


What a long hard Tweet it’s been

December 18, 2008

I’m so happy…  this is a great ending to a bad day.  Thanks Hubspot and Twitter Grader for making this possible!

It's taken awhile...

It's taken awhile...


So many cool new options for the business owner and entrepreneur

December 11, 2008

How did we use to do it before the internet and social media?  You can’t shut me up these days about Twitter, WordPress and LinkedIn.  I even find it bleeding into my  sessions with my life coaching clients.  It’s so easy.  One client, an avid  , is going to create a wiki that his family can all add their memories and pictures to.  Another client wanted to let people know about her conscious cooking program, and we are creating a WordPress site for her.  Another client is considering writing a blog rather than a book about her life – because it’s faster, easier, and not as daunting.  And she can get feedback.  The list goes on and on.  How are you using social media in your life?


More Twitter Tips for Newbie’s

November 11, 2008

I just love Guy Kawasaki,  Check out his latest blog with more useful Twitter tips!

http://blog.guykawasaki.com/2008/11/looking-for-m-1.html


Tip 1: Follow the “smores (social media whores*).” They are the folks with large number of followers and seem to be the opinion leaders (and perhaps even “heros”) of Twitter. You can get a good idea of who they are by viewing Twitterati.alltop, TwitterCounter, and Egos.alltop. There are three reasons to follow them: first, many have scripts that will auto follow you; second, you might learn something from watching what they tweet about; third, when people look at your profile to see who you follow, you want to appear that you have a clue. (*originally coined by @worleygirl who passed it to @pauladrum who passed it to me)

Tip 2: Send @ messages to the smores. They probably won’t answer you, but that’s okay. All you want to do is appear like you have a relationship with them to enhance your credibility. The theory is, “If she is tweeting with @scobleizeer, she must be worth following.” Bull shiitake logic, admittedly, but it helps. To bastardize what a famous PR person once told me, “It’s not who you know. It’s who appears to know you.”

Tip 3: Create an effective avatar. Your avatar is a window into your soul, so you need to create one that doesn’t look like you shot it with a camera phone while you were drunk. In most cases, use a simple, informal straight-up photo of just your face—not you and your dog, car, kids, or surfboard. Increase the exposure to brighter than you think it should be. Fix the red-eye. Crop the photo because Twitter is going to display it as a postage-stamp size image. If you can’t fix up your photo, send it to Fixmyphotos. Upload a large version of it (approximately 500 x 500 pixels) and let Twitter scale it down, so that when people zoom on your photo, they can see your gorgeousness and not an ugly pixelated image.

If you have access to cool image tools, then create an avatar that raises the question, “How did he do that?” (That’s the category I think my current avatar is in.) If you represent a company, then use its logo—but this is boring (sorry, Tony). Avatars with cleavage may help you get followers that you wouldn’t want, but that’s your call. Bottom line: When people view a stream of tweets, your avatar (and therefore your tweet) should stand out.

Tip 4: Follow everyone who follows you. When I first started on Twitter, Robert Scoble told me to follow everyone who followed me. “But why, Robert, would I follow everyone like that?” The answer is that it’s courteous to do so and because when you do, some people will respond to you and eveyone who follows them will see this—which is more exposure for you.

Having said this, when you get to more than fifty or so followers, it’s impossible to read what all your followers tweet. At that point, you have to focus on direct private messages (“Ds”) and direct public messages (“@s””).

Tip 5: Always be linking. The fact that your cat rolled over or your flight is delayed isn’t interesting, so get outside of your mundanity and link to interesting stories and pictures—you should think of yourself as a one-person StumbleUpon. The Twitter pickup artist’s mantra is ABL (“Always Be Linking”).

Make sure to check out Guy Kawasaki’s blogs daily!